nauseating

[ naw-zee-ey-ting, -zhee-, -see-, -shee- ]SEE DEFINITION OF nauseating
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NAUSEATING

I can talk shop with you without either shocking or nauseating you.

“A nauseating mess, no doubt,” carelessly remarked the land baron.

The taste of it came on his lips, nauseating and corrosive like some kinds of poison.

The very idea of drinking such filth is nauseating in the extreme.

The thick, salty taste persisted in his mouth, nauseating him.

Though very faint, its mere suggestion is foul and nauseating.

Perfect and nauseating beauty now marked that young gentleman.

And it's nauseating to think that you don't realize the rottenness of it.

The steaming odor of the room was nauseating and filled him with disgust.

The whole thing was nauseating, utterly disgusting, to Hampson.

WORD ORIGIN

1630s, "to feel sick, to become affected with nausea," from nauseat- past participle stem of Latin nauseare "to feel seasick, to vomit," also "to cause disgust," from nausea (see nausea). Related: Nauseated; nauseating; nauseatingly. In its early life it also had transitive senses of "to reject (food, etc.) with a feeling of nausea" (1640s) and "to create a loathing in, to cause nausea" (1650s). Careful writers use nauseated for "sick at the stomach" and reserve nauseous (q.v.) for "sickening to contemplate."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NAUSEATING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.