Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HORN

The horn will resound in welcome, the drawbridge will be lowered for us.

If the hunter fires then, over the horn, he will strike the beast's backbone.

The Coromandel was bound to Cadiz, and thence round the Horn.

The passage was a fine one, as we doubled the Horn at midsummer.

There had been no indication in von Horn's attitude toward the girl that he loved her.

She was an exposition of the domestic resources of Horn o' the Moon.

Even the fowl at Horn o' the Moon are not of the ordinary sort.

Suddenly he heard the blast of a horn close by, then the baying of hounds.

Suddenly the stillness of the night was broken by the sound of a horn.

“You seem to be great at blowing your own horn, at any rate,” said Dick, quietly.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English horn "horn of an animal," also "wind instrument" (originally made from animal horns), from Proto-Germanic *hurnaz (cf. German Horn, Dutch horen, Gothic haurn), from PIE *ker- "horn; head, uppermost part of the body," with derivatives refering to horned animals, horn-shaped objects and projecting parts (cf. Greek karnon "horn," Latin cornu "horn," Sanskrit srngam "horn," Persian sar "head," Avestan sarah- "head," Greek koryphe "head," Latin cervus "deer," Welsh carw "deer"). Reference to car horns is first recorded 1901. Figurative senses of Latin cornu included "salient point, chief argument; wing, flank; power, courage, strength." Jazz slang sense of "trumpet" is by 1921. Meaning "telephone" is by 1945.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HORN

cornet

nouninstrument
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.