Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TRAFFIC

Traffic was intense, and had reached what might be supposed its acme.

The whole current of the company's traffic to and fro passed under my eye.

By this traffic Germany had survived for a century and a half.

It is a mistake of sentiment to believe they have any real dislike to this traffic.

The law of God is unchangeable: as on earth, so in our traffic with heaven, we only get as we give.

The line was opened for traffic in 1830, having then an extent of fourteen miles.

Other lines, aggregating over 400 miles, will soon be opened for traffic.

But the traffic of the trunk lines brought a new factor into the problem.

This traffic is formally prohibited by most laws; but what are laws made for, if not to be broken?

These customs are instinctively related to the traffic of slaves.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1500, "trade, commerce," from Middle French trafique (mid-15c.), from Italian traffico (early 14c.), from trafficare "carry on trade," of uncertain origin, perhaps from a Vulgar Latin *transfricare "to rub across" (from Latin trans- "across" + fricare "to rub"), with the original sense of the Italian verb being "touch repeatedly, handle."

Or the second element may be an unexplained alteration of Latin facere "to make, do." Klein suggests ultimate derivation of the Italian word from Arabic tafriq "distribution." Meaning "people and vehicles coming and going" first recorded 1825. Traffic jam is 1917, ousting earlier traffic block (1895).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TRAFFIC

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.