Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STRICTEST

But the brothers keep every rule—of the strictest observance.

He was respected by his neighbours, and held the strictest views on morality.

The one and the many or others are reduced to their strictest arithmetical meaning.

The Shore Lane was not a public road, in the strictest sense of the term.

But in recent weeks—I tell you this in strictest confidence, understand!

By the strictest economy, he figured, it might be possible to save five.

This, of course, was in strictest secrecy, and so you must regard it.

Here has been Sir Gervais enjoining me to the strictest secresy.

They are said to be more difficult to seduce than the strictest of duennas.

The embellishments may be pleasing, but they are not of the strictest authenticity.

WORD ORIGIN

1590s, "narrow, drawn in, small," from Latin strictus "drawn together, tight, rigid," past participle of stringere "draw or bind tight" (see strain (v.)). The sense of "stringent and rigorous" (of law) is first found in 1570s; of qualities or conditions generally, 1580s.