fructose

[ fruhk-tohs, froo k-, frook- ]SEE DEFINITION OF fructose
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FRUCTOSE

The osones from glucose, mannose, and fructose are identical.

For the structural (stereochemical) relations of fructose see Sugar.

Slator supposes that glucose and fructose form the same compound with the enzyme.

Fructose is one of the sweetest of sugars, and helps to give honey its great sweetness.

There are two common in foods, glucose and fructose; a third, galactose, is derived from more complex sugars.

The fructose is precipitated as a saccharate, which is filtered, suspended in water and decomposed by carbon dioxide.

Like glucose and fructose, galactose seems to promote the production of glycogen in the body.

Three sugars of this type are known, only one (fructose) being common in plants; the others are of only theoretical interest.

Fructose (levulose, honey sugar, or "diabetic" sugar) occurs along with glucose in the juices of many fruits, etc.

When hydrolyzed by acids, or by the enzyme "invertase," it yields a mixture of equal quantities of glucose and fructose.

WORD ORIGIN

sugar found in fruit, 1864, coined in English from Latin fructus (see fruit) + chemical suffix -ose.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FRUCTOSE

carbohydrate

nounorganic compound composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.