caramel

[ kar-uh-muh l, -mel, kahr-muh l ]SEE DEFINITION OF caramel
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CARAMEL

Make 1/2 cupful of the sugar and the 1/2 cupful of water into caramel.

I must now speak of another sister, Caramel, though I do so with grief.

Have ready some caramel, and stir in enough to give a decided flavor.

I'll just trot this in for the supper, and we'll take the caramel layer to the Fair.

It was tea-time then at Caramel Cottage, and they sat down to take it.

The shade of color is proportional to the amount of caramel present.

Pour this jelly when it begins to stiffen over one of the layers of caramel.

A caramel has disagreed with her, or she would not have written in this despondent vein.

The caramel at the bottom of the mould will serve as a sauce.

It will have a glaze of caramel over the top, and some will run down the sides.

WORD ORIGIN

1725, from French caramel "burnt sugar" (17c.), via Old Spanish caramel (modern caramelo), ultimately from Medieval Latin cannamellis, traditionally from Latin canna (see cane (n.)) + mellis, genitive of mel "honey" (see Melissa). But some give the Medieval Latin word an Arabic origin, or trace it to Latin calamus "reed, cane."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CARAMEL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.