volition

[ voh-lish-uhn, vuh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF volition

Antonyms for volition

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR VOLITION

It seemed to have a vast inorganic life of its own, a volition and a whim.

Volition is surely an act of the mind, with which we are sufficiently acquainted.

She opened the outer door, and Mattie had no volition but to go.

Miss Georgie did not often send that last word of her own volition.

They talk about having faith, as if it could be done by an act of volition.

These are separable in thought, but united in any act of sensation, reflection, or volition.

Georgie came, partly of his own volition, partly because of the persuasive tug at his ankle.

It rose straight into the sky, apparently of its own volition.

It originates not a single material of thought, volition, or action.

It had no longer become a matter of volition, but an acute necessity.

WORD ORIGIN

1610s, from French volition (16c.), from Medieval Latin volitionem (nominative volitio) "will, volition," from Latin stem (as in volo "I wish") of velle "to wish," from PIE *wel-/*wol- "be pleasing" (see will (v.)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR VOLITION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.