Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SIDE

Her father rode by her side, and a numerous train of attendants followed.

His nephew, with his coat stripped off, was sitting on the side of the bed.

I fancy, now, there's not a good waiter this side of New York.

I fetched up at an exit on the side street, and there they were directly in front of me.

He led her, unresisting, around to the couch at the other side of the table.

He quickened his steps, and was soon at the side of our hero.

Of course, you are ready to side with a stranger against your own son.

My place was at Hester Paine's side, since she had accepted my escort.

It is an unequal bargain, where one side does all the loving.

If there's any awkwardness about it, it sha'n't be on my side.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English side "flanks of a person, the long part or aspect of anything," from Proto-Germanic *sithon (cf. Old Saxon sida, Old Norse siða, Danish side, Swedish sida, Middle Dutch side, Dutch zidje, Old High German sita, German Seite), from adjective *sithas "long" (cf. Old English sid "long, broad, spacious," Old Norse siðr "long, hanging down"), from PIE root *se- "long, late" (see soiree).

Original sense preserved in countryside. Figurative sense of "position or attitude of a person or set of persons in relation to another" (cf. choosing sides) first recorded mid-13c. Meaning "one of the parties in a transaction" is from late 14c.; sense in a sporting contest or game is from 1690s. Meaning "music on one side of a phonograph record" is first attested 1936. Phrase side by side "close together and abreast" is recorded from c.1200. Side-splitting "affecting with compulsive laughter" is attested by 1825.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SIDE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.