Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LOIN

The ribs and the loin cut in one piece are shown in Fig. 18.

Pork steaks or chops should be taken from the neck, or the loin.

Then put in some bits of loin of pork cut into dice and some bits of lean ham.

Sauce for a loin of veal was made of all kinds of sweet herbs, with the yolks of two or three hard eggs minced very fine.

A loin of pork with the fat and kidney taken out and boned, and a forehand of pork boned, are very nice dressed in the same way.

Take care also to cut out the pipe that runs along the chine of a loin of veal, the same as in beef, to hinder it from tainting.

The middle of the loin is the next best, and the rump the next.

The rib is the cut between the loin and chuck, and contains the best roasts.

Loin straps should be used with a ladys trap only when a servant drives.

This boy, who only wore a loin cloth, was urging his fellows not to work so hard.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "side of the body of an animal used for food," from Old French loigne "hip, haunch, lumbar region," from Vulgar Latin *lumbea, from *lumbea caro "meat of the loin," from fem. of *lumbeus, adjective used as a noun, from Latin lumbus "loin" (see lumbago).

Replaced Old English lendenu "loins," from Proto-Germanic *landwin- (cf. German Lende "loin," Lenden "loins;" Old High German lenti, Old Saxon lendin, Middle Dutch lendine, Dutch lende, Old Norse lend).

The Latin word perhaps was borrowed from a Germanic source. In reference to the living human body, it is attested from late 14c. In Biblical translations, often used for "that part of the body that should be covered and about which the clothes are bound" (1520s). Related: Loins.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LOIN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.