Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SEETHING

He was stung by some old recollection, and had marched off, seething with fury.

"The whole town is seething with indignation," he called to me.

And on that horizon are the gilded domes and smoking chimneys of the seething city.

Who would think, to look on a scene like this, that the city is seething with dissatisfaction?

Under a more or less calm exterior he was a seething cauldron of passion.

Nought remained where they had been but the seething waters.

One by one the tubes were discharged and tossed down at the seething mob.

In less than an hour other thoughts were seething in his head.

The memory of that moment in his arms was seething within her.

With a seething souse the slops went abroad, all over the floor.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English seoþan "to boil," also figuratively, "be troubled in mind, brood" (class II strong verb; past tense seaþ, past participle soden), from Proto-Germanic *seuthan (cf. Old Norse sjoða, Old Frisian siatha, Dutch zieden, Old High German siodan, German sieden "to seethe"), from PIE root *seut- "to seethe, boil."

Driven out of its literal meaning by boil (v.); it survives largely in metaphoric extensions. Figurative use, of persons or populations, "to be in a state of inward agitation" is recorded from 1580s (implied in seething). It had wider figurative uses in Old English, e.g. "to try by fire, to afflict with cares." Now conjugated as a weak verb, and past participle sodden (q.v.) is no longer felt as connected.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SEETHING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.