tumid

[ too-mid, tyoo- ]SEE DEFINITION OF tumid
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TUMID

The tumid nothingness of pure transcendentalism he has always abhorred.

With all his tumid boasts, he's like the sword-fish, who only wears his weapon in his mouth.

The listener's face was tumid and discoloured, his eyes bloodshot.

A low-spired, globular shell with a large, tumid, smooth body-whorl.

And of some tumid metaphors he says, "All too forced and over-charged."

The poetry is not of that tumid nature which Pindar uses, but of the graceful simplicity of Homer's verse.

In another place in the same lives his tumid and prolix eloquence disembogues itself to prove, what no man ever doubted, viz.

A tumid abdomen, rapid emaciation, and anmia are far more valuable signs of the disease of these glands.

Note the tumid convex clypeus which composes most of the anterior aspect of the head.

There are some pleasing passages in Arnobius, but on the whole he is a tumid and a tedious author.

WORD ORIGIN

"morbidly swollen," 1540s, from Latin tumidus, from tumere "to swell" (see thigh). Figurative sense (in reference to prose, etc.) is attested from 1640s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TUMID

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.