Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORE PRECISE

Will your Majesty be more precise as to the grounds of your complaint?

Or it might be more precise to say that they regarded her as being Leonora's daughter.

This determination, however, is insufficient, and we can make it more precise.

It is possible to limit it, to put it into more precise language.

To be more precise, the time was the close of the year 1869.

If you are not more precise, I shall think that you have defrauded me.

In the absence of more precise records it is difficult to establish the truth.

But a second glance showed a more precise reason for his impression.

The news of the advance of the Austrians became more and more precise.

I do not pretend to give you any more precise direction than this.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-15c., from Middle French précis "condensed, cut short" (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin precisus, from Latin praecisus "abrupt, abridged, cut off," past participle of praecidere "to cut off, shorten," from prae "before" (see pre-) + caedere "to cut" (see -cide; for Latin vowel change, see acquisition). Related: Precisely (late 14c.).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.