Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HABIT

In you I was sure of a mind strong enough to break the fetters of habit.

It was his habit to affect that he constantly forgot his mother's name.

She was not a woman in the habit of reasoning, and had no conception of the difficulties in his way.

I am in the habit of boarding at a quiet house kept by a widow.

At first you kept on wondering what the joke was, till you saw it was only a habit Sarah had.

She lived by habit, by the punctual fulfillment of her expectation.

To the material alone we are in the habit of ascribing power.

We form a habit of conquering as insistent as any other habit.

Aggie demanded, with that slangy diction which was her habit.

It is an English habit to rail at the lavish expenditure of the French Government.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "characteristic attire of a religious or clerical order," from Old French habit, abit (12c.) "clothing, (ecclesiastical) habit; conduct," from Latin habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress," originally past participle of habere "to have, to hold, possess," from PIE root *ghabh- "to seize, take, hold, have, give, receive" (cf. Sanskrit gabhasti- "hand, forearm;" Old Irish gaibim "I take, hold, I have," gabal "act of taking;" Lithuanian gabana "armful," gabenti "to remove;" Gothic gabei "riches;" Old English giefan, Old Norse gefa "to give").

Base sense probably "to hold," which can be either in offering or in taking. Applied in Latin to both inner and outer states of being, and taken over in both sense by English, though meaning of "dress" is now restricted to monks and nuns. Meaning "customary practice" is early 14c. Drug sense is from 1887.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HABIT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.