Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DIZZY

For as he tried to sit up, he fell back sick and dizzy on the bed.

Harriet's climbing was not so rapid as to make her dizzy; but business was coming.

My head is so dizzy, and my eyes so——What do you think, sir?

"Hardly," replied Christian, gazing upwards at the dizzy height.

The tremendous shaking had made her dizzy, and she lost her memory for some days.

She was dizzy and had to put her hand on the rock to steady herself.

I—I feel like a dizzy creature standing at the edge of a precipice.

Dizzy from his rapid glide downwards, Juve raised his lantern.

Gervaise, dizzy, her heart full, pressed her handkerchief to her lips.

He tried to stand, but his head swam and he became so dizzy that he feared to fall.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English dysig "foolish, stupid," from Proto-Germanic *dusijaz (cf. Low German düsig "dizzy," Dutch duizelen "to be dizzy," Old High German dusig "foolish," German Tor "fool," Old English dwæs, Dutch dwaas "foolish"), perhaps from PIE *dheu- (1) "dust, vapor, smoke; to rise in a cloud" (and related notions of "defective perception or wits").

Meaning "having a whirling sensation" is from mid-14c.; that of "giddy" is from c.1500 and seems to merge the two earlier meanings. Used of the "foolish virgins" in early translations of Matthew xxv; used especially of blondes since 1870s. Related: Dizzily.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DIZZY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.