Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CROWN

I wonder that they have not wit to learn English now that they have come under the English crown.

Why, you jack-fool, what would it be about save who should wear the crown of France?

She took the crown from her head with her own hands, and ceased to be the ruler of Sweden.

No fear of any trouble from him after that, in the way of plots for the Crown, or things of that sort.

The martyr's crown awaits them, for they display the martyr's spirit.

This led me to request a sight of that villa—a crown to the housekeeper got me admittance.

If it is the crown of sex to be desired, here you have it, under seal of the civil bond.

Upon his head was a crown, on which were inlaid or set precious stones.

Shall I crown you with our wild-wood coronal, and hail you queen of the forest?

A nice figure you'll cut in the office, to-day, with those ornaments on your crown!

WORD ORIGIN

early 12c., "royal crown," from Anglo-French coroune, Old French corone (13c., Modern French couronne), from Latin corona "crown," originally "wreath, garland," related to Greek korone "anything curved, kind of crown." Old English used corona, directly from Latin.

Extended to coins bearing the imprint of a crown (early 15c.), especially the British silver 5-shilling piece. Also monetary units in Iceland, Sweden (krona), Norway, Denmark (krone), and formerly in German Empire and Austria-Hungary (krone). Meaning "top of the skull" is from c.1300. Crown-prince is 1791, a translation of German kronprinz.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CROWN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.