Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BREAK EVEN

Don't forget I've warned you what'll happen if you try to break even with me.

All I want in this world is to break even with Wynn and Katz.

It might break even the Mahon machines in this installation?

You will die, and by a death which will break even your spirit.

"I'll make a hedging bet and break even with you, Mr. Massingale," he said.

But we'll break even on that when he works along th' boundary.

I will break even with you both, said the third gentleman, leaning across.

You've done a lot uh mourning, now here's a chance to break even on me.

Ay, have I; but it is possible to break even a friendship of twenty years.

It's only fair your dad should break even for some of the whiskey he give the Lone Star.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English efen "level," also "equal, like; calm, harmonious; quite, fully; namely," from Proto-Germanic *ebnaz (cf. Old Saxon eban, Old Frisian even "level, plain, smooth," Dutch even, Old High German eban, German eben, Old Norse jafn, Danish jævn, Gothic ibns).

Etymologists are uncertain whether the original sense was "level" or "alike." Used extensively in Old English compounds, with a sense of "fellow, co-" (e.g. efeneald "of the same age;" Middle English even-sucker "foster-brother"). Of numbers, from 1550s. Modern adverbial sense (introducing an extreme case of something more generally implied) seems to have arisen 16c. from use of the word to emphasize identity ("Who, me?" "Even you," etc.) Sense of "on an equal footing" is from 1630s. Rhyming reduplication phrase even steven is attested from 1866; even break first recorded 1911. Even-tempered from 1875.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BREAK EVEN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.