Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TIMES

But all he'd ever say was that times had changed since my day, and I wasn't to mind him.

Of course you'll do it, and you could do it better if you had three or four times the stake you got.

He had himself been obliged to bail out three times, running in from the reef.

It came from the furnace of the Revolution, tempered to the necessities of the times.

To consider these evils, to find their remedy, is the most sore necessity of our times.

The strong man must at all times be alert to the attack of insidious disease.

They belonged to the times when 30,000 men were an army, and when campaigns were spent in sieges.

Both sexes, and all ages, are busy at all times in the mysteries of the gaming-table.

Of course, in times of peace, they may facilitate the common business of politics.

They also know how to conduct themselves according to times and seasons.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English tima "limited space of time," from Proto-Germanic *timon "time" (cf. Old Norse timi "time, proper time," Swedish timme "an hour"), from PIE *di-mon-, from root *da- "cut up, divide" (see tide).

Abstract sense of "time as an indefinite continuous duration" is recorded from late 14c. Personified since at least 1509 as an aged bald man (but with a forelock) carrying a scythe and an hour-glass. In English, a single word encompasses time as "extent" and "point" (French temps/fois, German zeit/mal) as well as "hour" (e.g. "what time is it?" cf. French heure, German Uhr). Extended senses such as "occasion," "the right time," "leisure," or times (v.) "multiplied by" developed in Old and Middle English, probably as a natural outgrowth of phrases like, "He commends her a hundred times to God" (Old French La comande a Deu cent foiz).

Time of day (now mainly preserved in negation, i.e. what someone won't give you if he doesn't like you) was a popular 17c. salutation (e.g. "Good time of day vnto your Royall Grace," "Richard III," I.iii.18). Times as the name of a newspaper dates from 1788. Time warp first attested 1954; time capsule first recorded 1938, in reference to New York World's Fair; time-traveling in the science fiction sense first recorded 1895 in H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine." To do time "serve a prison sentence" is from 1865. Time frame is attested by 1964; time line (also timeline) by 1890; time-limit is from 1880. About time, ironically for "long past due time," is recorded from 1920. Behind the times "old-fashioned" is recorded from 1846, first attested in Dickens.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TIMES

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.