Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SMILING

The earth was like a slumbering babe, smiling in its sleep, because it dreams of Heaven.

"I am afraid I should make a poor hand at it," said Mrs. Rushton, smiling.

"I don't believe he feels very friendly to me," said Robert, smiling.

"I don't believe we shall quarrel on that point," said the widow, smiling.

She was smiling now, and he caught a gleam of mischief in her eyes.

"Pierre is as tall as his father," he said, smiling at the youth.

I see him smiling and debonair at the minute when I am in a ferment.

Mr. Durant looked over at her, and tried to keep his eyes from smiling.

And, when he held out his hand, smiling: "I just had to do it, Mr. K."

Just then a French tourist came up and accosted us, smiling ruefully.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, perhaps from Middle Low German *smilen or a Scandinavian source (e.g. Danish smile "smile," Swedish smila "smile, smirk, simper, fawn"), from Proto-Germanic *smil-, extended form of PIE root *smei- "to laugh, smile" (cf. Old English smerian "to laugh at, scorn," Old High German smieron "to smile," Latin mirus "wonderful," mirari "to wonder"). Related: Smiled; smiling.

Gradually pushed the usual Old English word, smearcian (modern smirk), into a specific, unpleasant sense. Of the eyes, from 1759. Figuratively, as indicating favor or encouragement, from c.1400. Romance, Celtic, and Slavic languages tend to use a diminutive of the word for "laugh" to mean "smile" (e.g. Latin ridere "laugh;" subridere "smile"), perhaps literally "small laugh" or "low laugh."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SMILING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.