Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PLACING

This consists in placing a piece of white paper in the oven.

Side by side with the wonders he described so casually, she was placing the little house.

Then, placing his finger on the electric button, he added: "What will you drink?"

There had been great unison in the Porter household over the placing of Alan.

Peter's furniture had come and he had been placing it without telling her.

In cold weather warm the salt by placing it before the fire.

This appeal was placing Jim alongside of his two big brothers.

It is not so much even as a collocating or placing force of matter itself.

"There is the barrier," she said, placing her hand on the flag-pole.

Placing the telegram in his pocket, he hurried down the stair and out to the street.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, "space, dimensional extent, room, area," from Old French place "place, spot" (12c.) and directly from Medieval Latin placea "place, spot," from Latin platea "courtyard, open space; broad way, avenue," from Greek plateia (hodos) "broad (way)," fem. of platys "broad" (see plaice).

Replaced Old English stow and stede. From mid-13c. as "particular part of space, extent, definite location, spot, site;" from early 14c. as "position or place occupied by custom, etc.; position on some social scale;" from late 14c. as "inhabited place, town, country," also "place on the surface of something, portion of something, part," also, "office, post." Meaning "group of houses in a town" is from 1580s.

Also from the same Latin source are Italian piazza, Catalan plassa, Spanish plaza, Middle Dutch plaetse, Dutch plaats, German Platz, Danish plads, Norwegian plass. Wide application in English covers meanings that in French require three words: place, lieu, and endroit. Cognate Italian piazza and Spanish plaza retain more of the etymological sense.

To take place "happen" is from mid-15c. To know (one's) place is from c.1600; hence figurative expression put (someone) in his or her place (1855). Place of worship attested from 1689, originally in official papers and in reference to assemblies of dissenters from the Church of England. All over the place "in disorder" is attested from 1923.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PLACING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.