medicine

[ med-uh-sin or, esp. British, med-suhn ]SEE DEFINITION OF medicine
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MEDICINE

Beatrice, what have you done with my new bottle of medicine?

Then she exchanged it for one of the same size on the medicine tray.

There was a mistake about the medicine, and she was blamed; that's all.

"It was the dark-eyed one that changed the medicine on me," he said.

But let us reason together, brother; don't you believe at all in medicine?

It is not the doctors themselves that he takes off, but the absurdity of medicine.

Nobody spoke until it was back again in the Medicine bundle.

The medicine (God's grace) is made known to us in the Creed.

He must desire and seek the medicine, and have it brought to him.

The Medicine Bundle of the tribe is as sacred to them as our flag is to us.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, "medical treatment, cure, remedy," also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French médicine) "medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion," from Latin medicina "the healing art, medicine; a remedy," also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina "the medical art," from fem. of medicinus (adj.) "of a doctor," from medicus "a physician" (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning "a medicinal potion or plaster" in English is mid-14c.

To take (one's) medicine "submit to something disagreeable" is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man "shaman" is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of "magical influence." The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show "traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them" is American English, 1938. Medicine ball "stuffed leather ball used for exercise" is from 1889.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MEDICINE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.