chartreuse

[ shahr-trooz, -troos; French shar-trœz ]SEE DEFINITION OF chartreuse
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CHARTREUSE

At last he condescended to serve the brothers two glasses of Chartreuse.

"Coffee and chartreuse," he said to the waiter, when we had finished.

Chartreuse is the unsolved enigma of French compounders of liqueurs.

"It's the chartreuse that's lacking," commented Caraher, lowering at Annixter.

It bulged in the middle, and had a chartreuse rind with heliotrope spots on it.

Its population was to be seen nowhere else; it seemed to exist only at the Chartreuse and for the Chartreuse.

And last and chief, the mill in the valley of the Chartreuse.

Clelia Conti in the Chartreuse is like the conventional heroine of Italian romance.

The Chartreuse, which is not in the forest, but merely some hundred feet from it.

From there we went to the Correrie; it was the supplement of the Chartreuse.

WORD ORIGIN

type of liqueur, 1866, from la Grande-Chartreuse, chief monastery of the Carthusian order, which was founded 11c. and named for the massif de la Chartreuse (Medieval Latin Carthusianus) mountain group in the French Alps, where its first monastery was built. The liqueur recipe dates from early 17c.; the original now marketed as Les Pères Chartreux. The color (1884) is so called from resemblance to the pale apple-green hue of the best type of the liqueur.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CHARTREUSE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.