emerald

[ em-er-uh ld, em-ruh ld ]SEE DEFINITION OF emerald
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EMERALD

Also introduced the brogue and the shamrock into the Emerald Isle.

We were soon in bed, and at ten o'clock started for Emerald and Springsure.

At Emerald, the rail to Springsure branches off from the main line to Barceldine.

There 's scarce a snake of any size hasn't an emerald or splice of gold in him.

It lies between the Duke's and Squire Hillcrist's—an emerald isle.

You wore evening dress, and I saw that emerald ring you have now on your finger.

There was also an Australian opal and an Asian emerald, the latter greener than the grass.

Before them was a square, grassy place, smooth and green as an emerald.

Is not the quip of the Curé worthy of any son of the Emerald Isle?

"It is a vase made of an emerald stone," answered the stranger.

WORD ORIGIN

"bright green precious stone," c.1300, emeraude, from Old French esmeraude (12c.), from Medieval Latin esmaraldus, from Latin smaragdus, from Greek smaragdos "green gem" (emerald or malachite), from Semitic baraq "shine" (cf. Hebrew bareqeth "emerald," Arabic barq "lightning").

Sanskrit maragdam "emerald" is from the same source, as is Persian zumurrud, whence Turkish zümrüd, source of Russian izumrud "emerald."

Emerald Isle for "Ireland" is from 1795.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.