Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR VAMPIRE

The horrible doubts which he had driven away were sucking at his heart like a vampire.

It is said that the vampire has a sort of hunger, which makes him eat the linen which envelops him.

Popery is the vampire that is sucking the life-blood of the country.

Why should a man be ever shadowed by the vampire wing of his past?

It was as if the place was a vampire that was sucking the life and health from our veins.

He whom a vampire has slain is supposed, in some countries, himself to become a vampire.

Moreover, the Regular name for a vampire in Servian, he remarks, is vukodlak.

It is not only during sleep that the Vampire is to be dreaded.

"Vampire" as a book-hunter, 55—his collection, 56 et seq.—his policy at auctions, 57 et seq.

Dragon and Vampire were spiraling away in opposite directions.

WORD ORIGIN

1734, from French vampire or German Vampir (1732, in an account of Hungarian vampires), from Hungarian vampir, from Old Church Slavonic opiri (cf. Serbian vampir, Bulgarian vapir, Ukrainian uper), said by Slavic linguist Franc Miklošič to be ultimtely from Kazan Tatar ubyr "witch," but Max Vasmer, an expert in this linguistic area, finds that phonetically doubtful. An Eastern European creature popularized in English by late 19c. gothic novels, however there are scattered English accounts of night-walking, blood-gorged, plague-spreading undead corpses from as far back as 1196. Applied 1774 by French biologist Buffon to a species of South American blood-sucking bat.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR VAMPIRE

bloodsucker

nounextortionist
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.