Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TAMING

In all his experience no one had ever succeeded in taming him so completely—and in so brief a time.

Is there not a certain glow of triumph in taming such a fraction?

The jade had to come to him, at last, completely subdued, as in the “Taming of the Shrew.”

"Sixty Philips will I pay for the joy of taming that wild cat," said he.

Just, however, as he was taming to enter the house, Mr Jarman came up.

Why of Shakspeare, in his Taming of the Shrew, and elsewhere?

We will escape all in good time if we don't succeed in taming the bear.

And the time had gone by when he would have enjoyed the taming of a girl.

Even on Earth, when the taming had been done, they moved on.

You are taming me; and if he leaves me to you I may be more dutiful when he comes back.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English tom, tam "domesticated, docile," from Proto-Germanic *tamaz (cf. Old Norse tamr, Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch tam, Old High German zam, German zahm "tame," Gothic tamjan "to tame"), from PIE *deme- "to constrain, to force, to break (horses)" (cf. Sanskrit damayati "tames;" Persian dam "a tame animal;" Greek daman "to tame, subdue," dmetos "tame;" Latin domare "to tame, subdue;" Old Irish damnaim "I tie up, fasten, I tame, subdue"). Possible ulterior connection with PIE *dem- "house, household" (see domestic). Meaning "spiritless, weak, dull" is recorded from c.1600.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.