Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCAB

Threats against "scabs" were shouted out, the word "scab" arose on every side.

In those days they used a scab from the arm of someone who had been vaccinated.

When the scab was all off, the nose was found to be quite uninjured.

This scab is caused by a fungous growth on the surface of the potato.

With the same (or Bordeaux for scab) just after the blossoms fall.

"You'll never get it finished with scab labor, Mr. Tyler," says Hartley.

In his heart of hearts, he sympathised with the strikers and hated this "scab."

Do you know, Guy, I think we shall have no scab in the fold this year.

Some are unhealthy, subject to the attacks of scab and rosette.

The feeling was like a scab Simon knew he should not pick but could not let alone.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c., "skin disease," developed from Old English sceabb "scab, itch" (related to scafan "to shave, scrape, scratch") and from Old Norse skabb "scab, itch," both from Proto-Germanic *skab- "scratch, shave," from PIE *(s)kep- "to cut, scrape, hack" (see scabies). Sense reinforced by cognate Latin scabies "scab, itch, mange" (from scabere "to scratch").

Meaning "crust which forms over a wound or sore" is first attested c.1400. Meaning "strikebreaker" first recorded 1806, from earlier sense of "person who refuses to join a trade union" (1777), probably from meaning "despicable person" (1580s), possibly borrowed in this sense from Middle Dutch.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SCAB

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.