Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR POLE

The Pole being surrounded by water, must be reached by boats.

If the Pole is surrounded by water, it must be a visible point of land.

If you will look outside, you will see a flag at the top of a pole.

But we cannot set up a pendulum to swing at the pole of the earth.

The pole and the canopy of the hammock tangled inextricably its occupant.

Who that has poached a pile does not gravitate there, as the needle to the pole?

Cook on the backs of the little mirrors hanging from the pole hooks!

I may almost say their temperature would be the same at the Equator as the Pole.

We can return after we have discovered the Pole quite as well as before, and even better.

But tell me, said Hatteras in a hurried manner; you were not bound for the Pole then yourself?

WORD ORIGIN

"stake," late Old English pal "stake, pole, post," a general Germanic borrowing (cf. Old Frisian and Old Saxon pal "stake," Middle Dutch pael, Dutch paal, Old High German pfal, Old Norse pall) from Latin palus "stake" (see pale (n.)).

Racing sense of "inside fence surrounding a course" is from 1851; pole position in auto racing attested from 1904. A ten-foot pole as a metaphoric measure of something one would not touch something (or someone) else with is by 1839, American English. The ten-foot pole was a common tool used to set stakes for fences, etc., and the phrase "Can't touch de bottom with a ten foot pole" is in the popular old minstrel show song "Camptown Races."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR POLE

cane

nounstick to aid walking of disabled
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.