Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORE POSITIVE

But she was determined to obtain a more positive answer from him.

I should like to put the question upon a more positive plane.

Elinor's satisfaction, at the moment of removal, was more positive.

Jason groped for a question that might get a more positive answer.

He paused to make sure, then repeated his remark in a more positive manner.

Mrs. Mel spoke in a more positive tense: 'And so will I, Van.

But the comfort which Aunt Laetitia could give was of a more positive kind.

I am positive there was three or four, if not more—positive of three.

The count, try all he knew, could obtain no more positive information.

That was the view of the Guards, and it grew more and more positive.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., originally a legal term meaning "formally laid down," from Old French positif (13c.) and directly from Latin positivus "settled by agreement, positive" (opposed to naturalis "natural"), from positus, past participle of ponere "put, place" (see position (n.)).

Sense of "absolute" is from mid-15c. Meaning in philosophy of "dealing only with facts" is from 1590s. Sense broadened to "expressed without qualification" (1590s), then "confident in opinion" (1660s); mathematical use is from 1704; in electricity, 1755. Psychological sense of "concentrating on what is constructive and good" is recorded from 1916.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.