Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORE COMICAL

The jurymen are excellent, and more comical still are the court officers.

A more comical result of the Braddock affair was that it made Franklin for a time a military man and a colonel.

Few things are more comical than to hear some douce body, unread in Borrow, gravely inquiring how far his word may be relied upon.

A more comical countenance than he possessed I don't remember ever to have seen.

The facts of the case make this remark of Mrs. Candour's the more comical.

To many, he is more comical than ugly, and no creature has more beautiful eyes than this same homely toad.

This was the more comical, as not one out of ten of the poor wretches he addressed had the chance to refuse either.

No more comical sport could be witnessed than the lurky race which was held every season.

One of these immediately asked the other, "If he had seen a more comical adventure a great while?"

In this fine town of Nagasaki, about five or six o'clock in the evening, one hour of the day is more comical than any other.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "comic," from comic (or Latin comicus) + -al (1). Meaning "funny" is from 1680s. Earlier Middle English had an identical word meaning "epileptic," from Latin morbus comitialis "epilepsy."