Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR KEEL OVER

Then one could go out into the midst of the people and keel over a world.

Yes, and I saw that he was about to keel over, interrupted Mr. Swaim.

I feel it in my bones, and I don't give a damn when I keel over.

"Funny I had to keel over like that," he said grinning feebly.

"Say, if you're a-goin' to keel over like thet I pass," declared Ruff, in disgust.

Daren, if you did keel over—you'd die in my arms—not on the floor!

The result to the ram was that a hole was torn in her hull which caused her to keel over and sink.

Something has got to happen soon, or Im afraid Roger will keel over, or perhaps go out of his mind.

She stood gazing at them in horror, evidently expecting to see every one of them keel over and go to the bottom.

I didn't think Heron was the man to keel over in a faint, even for a thing like that.

WORD ORIGIN

"lowest timber of a ship or boat," mid-14c., probably from a Scandinavian source, cf. Old Norse kjölr "keel," Danish kjøl, Swedish köl, from Proto-Germanic *keluz, of uncertain origin. Some etymologists say this is unconnected with the keel that means "a ship, barge," which also is the root of Middle Dutch kiel "ship," Old English ceol "ship's prow," Old High German kiel, German Kiel "ship," but the two words have influenced each other. Barnhart, however, calls them cognates. This other word is said to be from Proto-Germanic *keula, from PIE *geul- "rounded vessel." Keel still is used locally in England and U.S. for "flat-bottomed boat," especially on the Tyne.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR KEEL OVER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.