conjunction

[ kuhn-juhngk-shuhn ]SEE DEFINITION OF conjunction
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONJUNCTION

In conjunction they had bestowed upon him hours of incomparable sweetness.

Circumstances have operated in conjunction with your skill to "medicine me to repose."

It is the conjunction of those two men that makes me suspicious.

But their absence, taken in conjunction with the absence of the others, certainly was remarkable.

He would take these men as part of the gang, working in conjunction with the boat.

Your mocking laughter would be hard to bear in conjunction with losing you.

Taken in conjunction with what happened to Barnes, it is deeply interesting.

In their conjunction these two events were to influence the destinies of Europe.

They had planned this move in conjunction with other and more important moves.

At times they act in conjunction with each other and at others, in opposition.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., originally of planets, from Old French conjonction "union, joining, sexual intercourse" (12c.), from Latin coniunctionem (nominative coniunctio), from past participle stem of coniugare "join together" (see conjugal). Cf. Italian congiunzione, Spanish conjunción. Grammatical sense (late 14c.) was in Latin, a loan-translation of Greek syndesmos. The word also had the meaning "sexual union" 17c.-18c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONJUNCTION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.