Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GANG

But no doubt the gang had thought caution to be the better part of hate.

"And that's why she's here now with a gang of crooks," he retorted.

Then, when you get in with the right people, you will open the front door some night and let in the gang.

I want to be sure to give the Turner woman time to get here while that gang is at work.

If you're caught here to-night, where would you get off—caught here with a gang of burglars?

He had been defied, trapped, made a victim of the gang who had killed his most valued informer.

When you hear that, come right in here, and tell me that the gang has squealed.

A solitary ruffian, indeed, is moody, but a gang of ruffians are jovial.

Gang but and get some sleep, for it's time we were at oor work.

But I think they'll a' gang daft, and spill bluid like wather!'

WORD ORIGIN

from Old English gang "a going, journey, way, passage," and Old Norse gangr "a group of men, a set," both from Proto-Germanic *gangaz (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Danish, Dutch, Old High German, German gang, Old Norse gangr, Gothic gagg "act of going"), from PIE root *ghengh- "to step" (cf. Sanskrit jangha "shank," Avestan zanga- "ankle," Lithuanian zengiu "I stride"). Thus not considered to be related to go.

The sense evolution is probably via meaning "a set of articles that usually are taken together in going" (mid-14c.), especially a set of tools used on the same job. By 1620s this had been extended in nautical speech to mean "a company of workmen," and by 1630s the word was being used, with disapproving overtones, for "any band of persons traveling together." Gangway preserves the original sense of the word, as does gangplank.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GANG

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.