Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CLUB

Almost every tavern of note about town hath or had its club.

Good beef and mutton will no longer serve his turn, I've been told at the club.

Red Morning had a club he had made, with a flint set into the side.

The club then adjourned to the outside, all except those who sat on the bench.

I believe you're only marrying me to get away from that club you're living in!

"Come and take it off my shoulders, then," answered Hercules, lifting his club.

Your club, Sir Philip, will do me honour by such an ostracism.

Mrs. Beaufort, who was waiting his return from his club, was in the dining-room.

He saw that, ordinarily, these two were the least important members of the club.

"I guess there's enough in the club treasury for a little spread," said Bart.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, "thick stick used as a weapon," from Old Norse klubba "cudgel" or a similar Scandinavian source (cf. Swedish klubba, Danish klubbe), assimilated from Proto-Germanic *klumbon, related to clump (n.). Old English words for this were sagol, cycgel. Specific sense of "bat used in games" is from mid-15c.

The club suit in the deck of cards (1560s) bears the correct name (Spanish basto, Italian bastone), but the pattern adopted on English cards is the French trefoil. Cf. Danish klőver, Dutch klaver "a club at cards," literally "a clover."

The social club (1660s) apparently evolved from this word from the verbal sense "gather in a club-like mass" (1620s), then, as a noun, "association of people" (1640s).

Club sandwich recorded by 1899, apparently as a type of sandwich served in clubs; club soda is 1877, originally a proprietary name.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CLUB

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.