closed up

[ verb klohz; adjective, adverb klohs or for 51, klohz; noun klohz for 59, 60, 63–65, 67, 68, klohs for 61, 62, 66 ]SEE DEFINITION OF closed up
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CLOSED UP

Elias told me that he heard it was closed up, and we might get in there and not be able to get out.

It had become his fixed idea—the bar that closed up his life.

The people parted to let the four men pass, and then closed up and came after them.

After he had seen the column all "closed up" he rode the other way.

He beckoned with his arm, and they closed up and peered where he indicated.

We closed up the day with a dress parade, the Colonel in command.

When we closed up at nine he went to some other part of the hotel and stewarded.

They have closed up now, and there is no big gap in their line.

Six of these niches are closed up without any apparent reason.

There were little buildings around, but they were closed up.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, "to shut, cover in," from Old French clos- (past participle stem of clore "to shut, to cut off from"), 12c., from Latin clausus, past participle of claudere "to shut, close; to block up, make inaccessible; put an end to; shut in, enclose, confine" (always -clusus, -cludere in compounds).

The Latin word might be from the possible PIE root *klau- "hook, peg, crooked or forked branch" (used as a bar or bolt in primitive structures); cf. Latin clavis "key," clavus "nail," claustrum "bar, bolt, barrier," claustra "dam, wall, barricade, stronghold;" Greek kleidos (genitive) "bar, bolt, key," klobos "cage;" Old Irish clo "nail," Middle Irish clithar "hedge, fence;" Old Church Slavonic ključi "hook, key," ključiti "shut;" Lithuanian kliuti "to catch, be caught on," kliaudziu "check, hinder," kliuvu "clasp, hang;" Old High German sliozan "shut," German schließen "to shut," Schlüssel "key."

Also partly from Old English beclysan "close in, shut up." Intransitive sense "become shut" is from late 14c. Meaning "draw near to" is from 1520s. Intransitive meaning "draw together, come together" is from 1550s, hence the idea in military verbal phrase close ranks (mid-17c.), later with figurative extensions. Meaning "bring to an end, finish" is from c.1400; intransitive sense "come to an end" is from 1826. Of stock prices, from 1860. Meaning "bring together the parts of" (a book, etc.) is from 1560s. Related: Closed; closing.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CLOSED UP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.