synonyms
  • definitions

bust up

[ buhst-uhp ]SEE DEFINITION OF bust up
  • as inbreak
  • as inrive
  • as indispel

Synonyms for bust up

  • burst
  • crack
  • crash
  • crush
  • damage
  • fracture
  • separate
  • sever
  • shatter
  • smash
  • snap
  • split
  • tear
  • annihilate
  • batter
  • bust
  • demolish
  • disintegrate
  • divide
  • eradicate
  • fragment
  • part
  • rend
  • shiver
  • splinter
  • torpedo
  • total
  • trash
  • finish off
  • make hash of
  • make mincemeat of
  • pull to pieces
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for bust up

  • combine
  • fix
  • join
  • lose
  • mend
  • unite
  • aid
  • connect
  • help
  • agree
  • allow
  • attach
  • cause
  • fasten
  • hide
  • keep quiet
  • obey
  • put together
  • secret
  • secure
  • stabilize
  • stay
  • strengthen
  • wait
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BUST UP

Just because you are happy is no reason you should bust up my sleeping place.

And, say, for a minute there I thought we had bust up the show.

You guys think those axes are only to bust up furniture with?

He says it'll bust up the Republic before they've done with it.

Most things did bust up that I had to do with in those days.

One thing seemed to lead to another, and the show sort of bust up.

Mrs. Nunn set her lips, thrust her bust up and her chin out.

Only to see a man do a damn fool thing like that is enough to bust up any game.

If she dont have you run out of town, she may try to bust up your show.

It was all very well to say you were going to "bust up" Bull Harris' speech.

WORD ORIGIN

1690s, "sculpture of upper torso and head," from French buste (16c.), from Italian busto "upper body," from Latin bustum "funeral monument, tomb," originally "funeral pyre, place where corpses are burned," perhaps shortened from ambustum, neuter of ambustus "burned around," past participle of amburere "burn around, scorch," from ambi- "around" + urere "to burn." Or perhaps from Old Latin boro, the early form of classical Latin uro "to burn." Sense development in Italian is probably from Etruscan custom of keeping dead person's ashes in an urn shaped like the person when alive. Meaning "bosom" is by 1884.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BUST UP

break

verbdestroy; make whole into pieces
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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