Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TAKE WING

He had poised himself upon the top of the hill like a bird about to take wing.

Are they afraid to see me, that they all take wing as soon as I appear?

Just as I reached the rocks, I saw a covey apparently about to take wing.

This letter, begun in Edinburgh, is to take wing from Abbotsford.

At the sound of that laugh Esther's fears seemed to take wing.

So she knew that, since the natives were non-alate, she was not to take wing on Earth.

The summer is fledged; he will take wing before we realise it.

Every moment I expected the flock to take wing, but they lingered.

This sky above us seems so high up, I feel as if I could take wing and fly!

When disturbed, they take wing, and hastily quit their abodes.

WORD ORIGIN

late 12c., wenge, from Old Norse vængr "wing of a bird, aisle, etc." (cf. Danish and Swedish vinge "wing"), of unknown origin, perhaps from a Proto-Germanic *we-ingjaz and ultimately from PIE root *we- "blow" (cf. Old English wawan "to blow;" see wind (n.)). Replaced Old English feðra (plural) "wings" (see feather). The meaning "either of two divisions of a political party, army, etc." is first recorded c.1400; theatrical sense is from 1790.

Verbal phrase wing it (1885) is from theatrical slang sense of an actor learning his lines in the wings before going onstage, or else not learning them at all and being fed by a prompter in the wings. The verb to wing "shoot a bird in the wing" is from 1802. The slang sense of to earn (one's) wings is 1940s, from the wing-shaped badges awarded to air cadets on graduation. To be under (someone's) wing "protected by (someone)" is recorded from early 13c. Phrase on a wing and a prayer is title of a 1943 song about landing a damaged aircraft.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TAKE WING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.