Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TAKE STEPS

It ended by his promising to investigate and, if necessary, take steps 'immejitly.'

Take steps to discover the spy whose existence is disclosed by this event.

And he suggested that it would be proper to take steps for Mr. Cashers safety?

I shall speak to Sir Herbert, and he and the Rector will take steps.

He put up with it a dozen times or so, but finally he had to take steps.

She has really been to a solicitor, and means to take steps to get a divorce.

If the thing follows us, and I think we can be sure that it will, we'll have to take steps.

Run to the station and tell the inspector; they will take steps at once.

As his tormentors had sensibly relaxed, he was able to take steps for his own security.

At least it would be well for them to take steps before it is too late.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English steppan (Anglian), stæppan (West Saxon) "take a step," from West Germanic *stap- "tread" (cf. Old Frisian, Middle Dutch, Dutch stap, Old High German stapfo, German stapfe "footstep"), from PIE root *stebh- "to tread, step" (cf. Old Church Slavonic stopa "step, pace," stepeni "step, degree"). Originally strong (past tense stop, past participle bestapen); weak forms emerged 13c., universal from 16c. Stepping stone first recorded early 14c.; in the figurative sense 1650s. Step on it "hurry up" is 1923, from notion of gas pedal; step out (v.) is from 1907.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TAKE STEPS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.