Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RUSES

Once outside, Mathieu resolved that he would try no ruses with her.

The ruses adopted in flight are as varied as those of attack.

The enemy are also full of tricks and ruses for catching us by luring us into ambuscades.

And have your masks and your ruses, that ye may be mistaken for what you are, or somewhat feared!

Such is one of the ruses resorted to in war to deceive your antagonist.

The Belgæ tried all sorts of tricks and ruses to draw Cæsar from his position, but they did not succeed in doing this.

He did not respond to any of the ruses so often used to get a colored man to talk—scorn or incredulity or sternness.

All ruses they had ever heard of they tried over again to draw a fire and exhaust the besieged man's ammunition.

The honest diplomat, who maintained he'd discovered that to tell the truth was the greatest of ruses.

But these, emerging parched and sinking from their subterranean holes, were still equal to the ruses of their tormentors.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "dodging movements of a hunted animal;" 1620s, "a trick," from Old French ruse, reuse "diversion, switch in flight; trick, jest" (14c.), back-formed noun from reuser "to dodge, repel, retreat; deceive, cheat," from Latin recusare "deny, reject, oppose," from re-, intensive prefix (see re-), + causari "plead as a reason, object, allege," from causa "reason, cause" (see cause (n.)). It also has been proposed that the French word may be from Latin rursus "backwards," or a Vulgar Latin form of refusare. Johnson calls it, "A French word neither elegant nor necessary." The verb ruse was used in Middle English.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.