repudiated

[ ri-pyoo-dee-eyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF repudiated

Synonyms for repudiated

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REPUDIATED

Dir would have repudiated its ruler and joined the combination.

His mother, the great cosmopolitan city, had repudiated him.

He repudiated excessive reliance on the doctors of the church.

He called himself a minister but all church bodies have repudiated him.

"God forbid," repudiated the magistrate retiring towards the door.

He bridled up at the word "illiterate," and repudiated the vile insinuation.

Cranmer repudiated the report that he performed the ceremony.

Frederick had not only repudiated his love for her, but his baby too.

The dictatorship was fitted to be repudiated by Cincinnatus, and to be espoused by Cæsar.

The invasion by John Brown was repudiated by practically the entire North.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, "to cast off by divorce," from Latin repudiatus, past participle of repudiare "to cast off, put away, divorce, reject, scorn, disdain," from repudium "divorce, rejection, a putting away, dissolution of marriage," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + pudium, probably related to pes-/ped- "foot" [Barnhart]. If this is so, the original notion may be of kicking something away, but folk etymology commonly connects it with pudere "cause shame to." Of opinions, conduct, etc., "to refuse to acknowledge," attested from 1824. Earliest in English as an adjective meaning "divorced, rejected, condemned" (mid-15c.). Related: Repudiated; repudiating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REPUDIATED

discarded

adjectiverejected
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.