pomace

[ puhm-is, pom- ]SEE DEFINITION OF pomace
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR POMACE

In Europe, the seeds are separated from the pomace and used in various ways.

They will be dark in proportion to the length of time the pomace stands.

If the pomace is permitted to ferment, and afterwards is distilled, a product called pomace-brandy is made.

The pomace is also oftentimes used as a manure, for which it has considerable to recommend it, being rich in potash and nitrogen.

To make higher-colored wines let the pomace stand from four to twenty-four hours before pressing.

Cider was made at first by pounding the apples by hand in wooden mortars; sometimes the pomace was pressed in baskets.

In commercial practice the seeds are collected mostly from cider mills or from pomace.

Cider was tediously made at first by pounding the apples in wooden mortars; the pomace was afterward pressed in baskets.

After the juice has been extracted from the apples the pomace that remains is sometimes used as a fertilizer.

Such a case is that recently described by Morgan in America for the pomace fly (Drosophila ampelophila).

RELATED WORDS AND SYNONYMS FOR POMACE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.