Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NEEDLES

All we wanted was them needles and a little elbow-grease and gumption.

Pins and needles, thousands of them—and something feels tight.

The needles and string were to be used for mending the explorers' clothes.

No end of cotton and needles had to be sold to get such a sum together!

It seemed as though a dozen needles were penetrating little by little into his flesh.

Every pipe shank was lowered in an instant, and Grannie's needles ceased to click.

Let us go for universals; for the magnetism, not for the needles.

It was a disk as big as a dollar with a lot of needles in it.

But hurry on, my little man, for there are pins and needles in my legs.

Finish by putting the two needles having stitches on them together.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English nædl, from Proto-Germanic *næthlo (cf. Old Saxon nathla, Old Norse nal, Old Frisian nedle, Old High German nadala, German Nadel, Gothic neþla "needle"), literally "a tool for sewing," from PIE *net-la-, from root *(s)ne- "to sew, to spin" (cf. Sanskrit snayati "wraps up," Greek nein "to spin," Latin nere "to spin," German nähen "to sew," Old Church Slavonic niti "thread," Old Irish snathat "needle," Welsh nyddu "to sew," nodwydd "needle") + instrumental suffix *-tla.

Meaning "piece of magnetized steel in a compass" is from late 14c. (on a dial or indicator from 1928); the surgical instrument so called from 1727; phonographic sense from 1902; sense of "leaf of a fir or pine tree" first attested 1797. Needledom "the world of sewing" is from 1847. Needle's eye, figurative of a minute opening, often is a reference to Matt. xix:24.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NEEDLES

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.