Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PANIC

Seized with a panic, my mother, to make a man of me at once, sent me to —— school.

The panic excited by the squatter skunk had been another lesson.

But he had scarcely marked the paper when he started back, in a panic.

After the panic had once seized the enemy there was but little firing.

I have allowed myself to give way to panic like a child in the dark.

A panic was surging through me; must I be brought to book by such as he?

I came in a panic, which is still there, but in a modified degree.

Alice clutched Walter's arm in a panic; they were just at the driveway entrance.

Then, after a few moments, inactivity would bring him panic.

All the carriers dropped Smith's body and bolted in the panic.

WORD ORIGIN

"mass terror," 1708, from earlier adjective (c.1600, modifying fear, terror, etc.), from French panique (15c.), from Greek panikon, literally "pertaining to Pan," the god of woods and fields, who was the source of mysterious sounds that caused contagious, groundless fear in herds and crowds, or in people in lonely spots.

In the sense of "panic, fright" the Greek word is short for panikon deima "panic fright," from neuter of Panikos "of Pan." Meaning "widespread apprehension about financial matters" is first recorded 1757. Panic button in figurative sense is first recorded 1955, the literal sense apparently is from parachuting. Panic attack attested by 1970.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PANIC

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.