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View definitions for flute

flute

noun as in pleat

verb as in plait

verb as in whistle

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Example Sentences

Police picked up the flute from the pawnshop on Wednesday, Rabin said.

Retrieving the flute had little to do with its monetary worth, he said.

Meanwhile, Gabe Coconate, the owner of West Town Jewelry & Loan, told the Chicago Sun-Times he had already called police on Monday after his wife recognized the flute on a news report.

The flute is my livelihood and I’m trying every possible thing I can do to get it back.

A six-pack of 12-ounce cans works out to the equivalent of nine champagne flutes, which is great for a group.

If you drink from a flute, do so from a tulip-shape one to concentrate the notes, Simonetti-Bryan says.

By the time of the recording session, Brian had become quite agile with the flute and suggested adding it to the song.

Dodge was on his way to study the flute in Paris, but he decided to buy the bike, anyway.

Despite the sheer hilarity of the music itself, Detweiler claims that the flute drops are not an intentional joke.

At age 5, Desplat began to play the piano; his attention eventually turned to flute.

The flute and the psaltery make a sweet melody, but a pleasant tongue is above them both.

The flute, a component part of the organ, is one of the most ancient of musical instruments.

By blowing across this ring a fair but somewhat feeble Flute tone is produced.

The most admirable instruments of this characteristic have been variously compared to a flute or to the female voice.

We have worked this out for all classes of tone—string, flute and diapason—and the law holds good in every instance.

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On this page you'll find 66 synonyms, antonyms, and words related to flute, such as: trench, canal, corrugation, crease, crimp, and cut.

From Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

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