Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FACED DOWN

"Here is something that cannot be faced down with a laugh," he said stoutly.

"Yes, I could," answered Dave, with dogged resolution not to be faced down.

Pox on't, come what will, I'll not be faced down with a lie; I say, he is my man.

Swiftly, as if startled, she turned and faced down the slope.

Then, with a backward motion of the hand to enjoin silence, he faced down the branch path and stood calmly waiting.

He suddenly stopped and stood as though thinking; then wheeled, faced down the slope, and looked off into the distance.

He turned from them, but instead of crossing the street to go to his house, he faced down the little dark street to the factory.

Softly, silently he turned his bicycle so that it faced down the long hill he had just climbed.

This slope, it was found, was being swept by machine guns on the crest of the hill to the left which faced down the valley.

Auguste Guynemer remembered very vividly the day when he faced down Robespierre.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., "front of the head," from Old French face (12c.) "face, countenance, look, appearance," from Vulgar Latin *facia (cf. Italian faccia), from Latin facies "appearance, form, figure," and secondarily "visage, countenance;" probably related to facere "to make" (see factitious).

Replaced Old English andwlita (from root of wlitan "to see, look") and ansyn, the usual word (from the root of seon "see"). In French, the use of face for "front of the head" was given up 17c. and replaced by visage (older vis), from Latin visus "sight." To lose face (or save face), 1876, is said to be from Chinese tu lien. Face value was originally (1878) of bank notes, postage stamps, etc.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.