ancestors

[ an-ses-ter or, esp. British, -suh-ster ]SEE DEFINITION OF ancestors
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ANCESTORS

Their ancestors, like those of the Jews and the Babylonians, had been a desert folk.

Her name was Dorothea Taust; her father, like most of his ancestors, was a clergyman.

Half of its inhabitants have remained faithful to the faith of their ancestors.

These men were dressed as their ancestors had dressed in the time of Abraham, and Biddy and I envied them.

But how do the royal prerogatives affect our ancestors in England?

What troubles our ancestors most is the interference with their religious life.

His ancestors had long been large landed proprietors in Sussex.

Then do you infer that these men who must stand at their work inherited the idea from their ancestors?

Then he bought a burial-place for his ancestors, and supported his needy relations.

It sounds like an invitation to dishonour myself in the eyes of my ancestors.'

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, ancestre, antecessour, from Old French ancestre (12c., Modern French ancêtre), from Late Latin antecessor "predecessor," literally "foregoer," agent noun from past participle stem of Latin antecedere "to precede," from ante- "before" (see ante) + cedere "to go" (see cede). Current form from early 15c. Feminine form ancestress recorded from 1570s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ANCESTORS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.