Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WROTE

He wrote the directions on one of his cards and paid the man.

Since I wrote the above, I ventured to send a letter by Shorey to my mother.

Cardinal Newman wrote: "Gladstone's book, as you see, is making a sensation."

The following is a copy of what I wrote, and what follows that, of the answer sent me.

Handel, in one species of composition, wrote down to the singers of his time.

I'm sure that when I wrote these lines, fortune had for a moment tweaked me by the nose.

I wrote to you from Guilford, which I hope you have received.

He wrote to his cousin Helen asking if he might bring a friend with him.

Do you know, Ried, that the letter you wrote me was the first thing which attracted me to you?

It is a trait, moreover, which finds expression in almost everything he wrote.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English writan "to score, outline, draw the figure of," later "to set down in writing" (class I strong verb; past tense wrat, past participle writen), from Proto-Germanic *writanan "tear, scratch" (cf. Old Frisian writa "to write," Old Saxon writan "to tear, scratch, write," Old Norse rita "write, scratch, outline," Old High German rizan "to write, scratch, tear," German reißen "to tear, pull, tug, sketch, draw, design"), outside connections doubtful. Words for "write" in most I.E languages originally mean "carve, scratch, cut" (cf. Latin scribere, Greek grapho, Sanskrit rikh-); a few originally meant "paint" (cf. Gothic meljan, Old Church Slavonic pisati, and most of the modern Slavic cognates).

To write (something) off (1680s) originally was from accounting; figurative sense is recorded from 1889. Write-in "unlisted candidate" is recorded from 1932.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.