Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR VOGUE

Circular windows at this period came into vogue in the gables of churches.

My aunt then sang a song which was very much in vogue, and made a great success.

Although at every point she was far from vogue, she impressed me not unpleasantly.

I mean to say, I felt that I was vogue in the finest sense of the word.

When the philosophy of M. Descartes appeared, what a vogue it had!

I must remark that the poets have greatly contributed to set all these imaginations in vogue.

Brummelism—and I hate it—it is just Brummelism—is somewhat out of vogue at this time of day.

Mrs. Austen had known him when she was in shorter frocks than those then in vogue.

The mysteries of Isis, not in vogue in Greece, but very popular in Rome.

It was the vogue of the philosophers, and not their philosophy that made Catherine their friend.

WORD ORIGIN

1570s, the vogue, "leading place in popularity, greatest success or acceptance," from Middle French vogue "fashion, success, drift, swaying motion (of a boat)" literally "a rowing," from Old French voguer "to row, sway, set sail," probably from Old Low German *wogon, variant of wagon "float, fluctuate," literally "to balance oneself" (see weigh). Apparently the notion is of being "borne along on the waves of fashion." Italian vogare also probably is borrowed from Germanic. Phrase in vogue "having a prominent place in popular fashion" first recorded 1643. The fashion magazine began publication in 1892.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR VOGUE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.