Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SPOILT

I went to my sister Eliza, and I said: 'Some way or another, you've spoilt my life.

It can't spoil anything now to tell you, because everything is spoilt.

"You spoilt him, Jenkins; that's the fact," observed Mr. Galloway.

It is not only nonsense, but blasphemy, to say that man has spoilt the country.

He has only put four windows in, the villain, and spoilt it!'

They have failed in everything, spoilt everything, as though out of pleasure.

If you'd had your way, you'd have spoilt the fun to come, and ruined us.'

Perhaps if Vicky had been a boy she would have been spoilt and selfish too.

He saw himself as he had really been—selfish, unreasonable, and spoilt.

You see, Mother was far too strong and wise to spoil me as little Fay is spoilt.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, from Old French espoillier "to strip, plunder," from Latin spoliare "to strip of clothing, rob," from spolium "armor stripped from an enemy, booty;" originally "skin stripped from a killed animal," from PIE *spol-yo-, perhaps from root *spel- "to split, to break off" (cf. Greek aspalon "skin, hide," spolas "flayed skin;" Lithuanian spaliai "shives of flax;" Old Church Slavonic rasplatiti "to cleave, split;" Middle Low German spalden, Old High German spaltan "to split;" Sanskrit sphatayati "splits").

Sense of "to damage so as to render useless" is from 1560s; that of "to over-indulge" (a child, etc.) is from 1640s (implied in spoiled). Intransitive sense of "to go bad" is from 1690s. To be spoiling for (a fight, etc.) is from 1865, from notion that one will "spoil" if he doesn't get it. Spoil-sport attested from 1801.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SPOILT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.