Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SNOOD

A snood or fillet of blue ribbon confined her luxuriant hair.

A northern term for a snood or link of horse-hair for a fishing-line.

If the snood does not break you have him dangling in the air.

It is the rich materials of snood, plaid, and brooch that betray her birth.

Tied round the wimple they sometimes had a snood, or band of silk.

A snood, or bandeau of riband or worsted tape, was the only head-dress for maidens.

He stooped, and in the reeds he found an inch-long fragment of ribbon—of a snood.

Her hair was bound with the "snood," the usual head-dress of Scottish maidens.

The hair is parted and worn low in a snood, or by young women, flowing.

Now your snood is slipping over his nose; it tickles him; he enjoys it, and shuts his eyes.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English snod "ribbon for the hair," from Proto-Germanic *snodo (cf. Swedish snod "string, cord"), from PIE root *(s)ne- "to spin, sew" (cf. Lettish snate "a linen cover," Old Irish snathe "thread;" see needle (n.)). In the Middle Ages, typically worn by young unmarried girls, hence "It was held to be emblematic of maidenhood or virginity" [Century Dictionary]. Modern fashion meaning "bag-like hair net" first recorded 1938 (these also were worn by girls in the Middle Ages, but they are not snoods properly).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SNOOD

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.