Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SAFER

It won't be any safer to insult me now than it was yesterday.

Or perhaps it would be safer to begin with raspberries and cream.

And yet it would have been safer, before they guessed that I was so rich.

He contents himself with a house in a more convenient and safer spot.

However, I daresay it's safer for her that you can't ask her to tea.

"I don't know but what the woods are safer than the city," observed Fenn.

You see, it was safer to control his movements, and be sure of him.

She will be more comfortable there, and safer, too, I think.

No one would deny that the test proposed is fairer, speedier, and safer than any other.

It is more advantageous to you and safer for me, that I should not be known as your agent.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "unscathed, unhurt, uninjured; free from danger or molestation, in safety, secure; saved spiritually, redeemed, not damned;" from Old French sauf "protected, watched-over; assured of salvation," from Latin salvus "uninjured, in good health, safe," related to salus "good health," saluber "healthful," all from PIE *solwos from root *sol- "whole" (cf. Latin solidus "solid," Sanskrit sarvah "uninjured, intact, whole," Avestan haurva- "uninjured, intact," Old Persian haruva-, Greek holos "whole").

As a quasi-preposition from c.1300, on model of French and Latin cognates. From late 14c. as "rescued, delivered; protected; left alive, unkilled." Meaning "not exposed to danger" (of places) is attested from late 14c.; of actions, etc., "free from risk," first recorded 1580s. Meaning "sure, reliable, not a danger" is from c.1600. Sense of "conservative, cautious" is from 1823. Paired alliteratively with sound (adj.) from late 14c. The noun safe-conduct (late 13c.) is from Old French sauf-conduit (13c.).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.