synonyms
  • definitions

relieving

[ ri-leev ]SEE DEFINITION OF relieving

Synonyms for relieving

  • allay
  • alleviate
  • assuage
  • calm
  • comfort
  • cure
  • diminish
  • ease
  • free
  • mitigate
  • relax
  • soothe
  • subdue
  • abate
  • appease
  • break
  • brighten
  • console
  • decrease
  • divert
  • dull
  • interrupt
  • lighten
  • moderate
  • mollify
  • palliate
  • qualify
  • quiet
  • salve
  • slacken
  • soften
  • solace
  • temper
  • vary
  • take load off one's chest
  • take load off one's mind
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for relieving

  • aggravate
  • agitate
  • annoy
  • distress
  • excite
  • grow
  • hurt
  • incite
  • increase
  • intensify
  • irritate
  • provoke
  • rouse
  • upset
  • vex
  • worry
  • worsen
  • allow
  • darken
  • depress
  • enlarge
  • stay
  • trouble
  • accuse
  • blame
  • burden
  • condemn
  • discourage
  • harm
  • injure
  • pain
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RELIEVING

It was relieving to hurry across the dripping grass toward the barn.

Is he not the presiding genius of the company for relieving the Poles?

Why had Plowden, by the way, been so keen about relieving her from her father's importunities?

Soon after relieving Buford, we saw some Rebel infantry advancing.

What you planning to do, Joe, between now and relieving me at midnight?

And he had a peculiar little trick of relieving his kindly feelings.

Was that what Mr. Tooke meant by the surgeon's relieving me of my pain?

They tried to fight the relieving army, and then again they ran for the ships.

If she were innocent, then she must be in trouble, and he hoped to be instrumental in relieving her.

Gaspare was not in the habit of relieving her of her duties.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "alleviate (pain, etc.), mitigate; afford comfort; allow respite; diminish the pressure of," also "give alms to, provide for;" also figuratively, "take heart, cheer up;" from Old French relever "to raise, relieve" (11c.) and directly from Latin relevare "to raise, alleviate, lift up, free from a burden," from re-, intensive prefix (see re-), + levare "to lift up, lighten," from levis "not heavy" (see lever).

The notion is "to raise (someone) out of trouble." From c.1400 as "advance to the rescue in battle;" also "return from battle; recall (troops)." Meaning "release from duty" is from early 15c. Related: relieved; relieving.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RELIEVING

comforting

adjectivecheering
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.